| Sheriff Jay Koon |

The COVID-19 pandemic continues to change the way we as a society do things and, in some cases, our everyday lives. It’s changed the way we handle certain non-emergency calls at the Sheriff’s Department; however, we’re proud of the way the Lexington County community has policed itself when it comes to large gatherings and other activities that would go against Gov. McMaster’s executive orders during this state of emergency.


There are still some things we can expect to see during as the response to the health crisis continues: scams. In times of fear, uncertainty and mixed messages, scammers see an opportunity to make their move.

COVID-19 stimulus checks are in the bank after a direct deposit for many; however, some paper checks will soon start hitting mailboxes.

Scammers are using these stimulus payments to try to rip people off. They might try to get you to pay a fee to get your stimulus payment. Or they might try to convince you to give them your Social Security number, bank account, or government benefits debit card account number.


4 tips for avoiding a Coronavirus stimulus payment scam

  1. Only use irs.gov/coronavirus to submit information to the IRS – and never in response to a call, text, or email.
  2. The IRS won’t contact you by phone, email, text message, or social media with information about your stimulus payment, or to ask you for your Social Security number, bank account, or government benefits debit card account number. Anyone who does is a scammer phishing for your information.
  3. You don’t have to pay to get your stimulus money.
  4. The IRS won’t tell you to deposit your stimulus check then send them money back because they paid you more than they owed you. That’s a fake check scam.

Report scams or anything else related to someone trying to steal your money to the Sheriff’s Department or the Federal Trade Commission at ftc.gov/complaint.