Drug-impaired driving is dangerous driving

Like drunk driving, drug-impaired driving is impaired driving, which means it is dangerous and illegal in all 50 States, Puerto Rico and Washington, DC. Whether the drug is obtained legally or illegally, drug-impaired driving poses a threat to the driver, vehicle passengers and other road users.

If you are impaired by drugs and thinking about driving, pass your key on to a sober driver. The message is clear: If You Feel Different, You Drive Different. If you are impaired by drugs and thinking about driving, pass your key on to a sober driver. The message is clear: If you feel different, you drive different.

It is never OK to drive when impaired. This not only means refraining from drunk driving, but also from drug-impaired driving.

If you think driving while high won’t affect you, you are wrong: It has been proven that THC—the common name for the chemical responsible for most of marijuana’s psychological effects—slows reaction times, impairs cognitive performance, and makes it more difficult for drivers to keep a steady position in their lane.

The bottom line is this: It doesn’t matter what term is used, if a person is high, stoned, wasted or drunk, he or she is impaired.

New medication or increased dosages can affect people differently. If you are taking a new prescription drug or a higher dose of a current prescription drug, do not drive until you know what effect it has on your judgement, coordination and reaction time.

Any effect could impair your driving ability. Certain medications may not impair you on their own, but if taken with a second medication or with alcohol, they may cause impairment. Even something as simple as cold medication or an over-the-counter sleep aid could impair driving. If it does, you will be arrested for a DUI. Any form of impaired driving is illegal.